Graphic Design: Degree Or No Degree?

15 Nov Graphic Design: Degree Or No Degree?

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Throughout my design career I have came across many job adverts for a graphic designer ‘with a degree’. It always made me feel a little frustrated – “If I don’t have a degree do you automatically assume I won’t be good enough to join your company?”. Surely a designer’s portfolio and/or experience should say more than a piece of paper with a qualification on it.

I studied for a higher national diploma in graphic design at college and when the course finished I had the chance of pursuing a degree in graphic design or go for an advanced diploma in art and design. One of my lecturers told me that the degree contained more theory work whereas the advanced diploma was more practical. I opted for the practical work… after all that’s what graphic design is.

The advanced diploma was only a year of study but most of the work was project based even if the deadlines were a bit too generous at times. However, since leaving college (armed with my qualifications) I admit that I learnt more during my first design role and by teaching myself. That kind of education never stops with the design world and technology continually changing.

This led me to question the importance of a degree as a designer and I know that I’m not the only one to ask this. In my honest opinion a degree doesn’t automatically make someone more creative and successful than a designer who is self taught or who has learnt on the job. Their portfolio should be the strongest reflection of their skills and abilities especially when it comes to finding employment. Do companies advertising for a designer ‘with a degree’ honestly think that they are going to employ a better designer or is it a status thing?

Now I know that things have changed since I was at college so I thought I’d have a look at what degree courses my local college offers and found that they offer a BA in Art and Design. Here are the modules:

Year 1: Visual arts; applied crafts; digital arts; site specific design; graphic design; performance related   design ;  web   design ; animation; self-employment; video production; community art; textile design; teacher or lecturer.

Year 2: Creative skills and concepts; integrated project; visual literacy; digital applications; specialist options: skills development; contextual studies; personal development planning.

Year 3: Creative practice; contextual practice; specialist options: skills application practice; research skills; critical and contextual studies; pathways and contexts; professional and studio practice; professional and contextual studies; creative futures.

I didn’t study most of this stuff and I’ve spent 9 years in design studios working on a wide variety of projects of all sizes and with good feedback. I’m now working full-time as a freelancer trying to grow my own business. I like to think that I turned out okay without a degree.

So I guess my question is… does a degree make a better designer or is it all down to natural creative flair, experience and keeping up-to-date with the latest trends?

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